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Pediatr Int. 2017 Dec;59(12):1240-1245. doi: 10.1111/ped.13428.

Changes in trends and impact of testing for influenza in infants with fever <90 days of age.

Kim S1,2, Moon HM1,2, Lee JK1, Rhie K1, Yoon KW1,2, Choi EH1,3, Lee HJ1,3, Lee H3,2.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Children's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infants aged <90 days who present with fever commonly undergo various invasive procedures due to the risk of bacterial infection in this age group. A great proportion of cases, however, are due to viral infection, including influenza. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the impact of influenza testing in infants <90 days with fever, as well as analyze the subject characteristics to identify which infants should be considered for such testing.

METHODS:

Clinical characteristics and trends in influenza virus testing and treatment were analyzed among febrile infants <90 days who presented to the emergency room and were diagnosed with influenza during 2005-2015.

RESULTS:

Among 5,347 febrile infants aged <90 days, 963 (18%) underwent influenza virus test. A total of 114 (11.8%) were diagnosed with influenza. The positivity rate reached 67% of febrile infants during epidemics. Of them, 83 had a history of family contact. While more than half presented with upper respiratory symptoms, 34% had only fever without respiratory symptoms. A decrease in antibiotic use and admission rates during the study period among infants diagnosed with influenza was seen (P for trend <0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

During the influenza epidemic season, diagnostic tests for influenza based on a detailed contact history are necessary in assessing the cause of fever. Targeted testing for influenza may lead to a decrease in antibiotic use and admission rates in young infants.

KEYWORDS:

fever; infant; influenza

PMID:
28940983
DOI:
10.1111/ped.13428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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