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Reprod Toxicol. 2017 Dec;74:104-107. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2017.09.007. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Improving screening for alcohol consumption during pregnancy with phosphatidylethanol.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West Virginia University-Charleston Division, Charleston Area Medical Center, United States; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Southside Hospital, United States. Electronic address: lbracero@northwell.edu.
2
Pediatrix Medical Group and Department of Pediatrics, Charleston Area Medical Center, United States.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West Virginia University-Charleston Division, Charleston Area Medical Center, United States.
4
Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research, Charleston Area Medical Center Health Education and Research Institute, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The study objective was to compare rates of alcohol use between urine ethanol testing and self- reporting (Method: 1) and Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) dried blood spot testing and self-reporting (Method: 2).

METHODS:

This was a prospective observational study in an obstetric clinic with universal alcohol screening.

RESULTS:

Method: 1 identified 11 patients with alcohol use (5 urine and 6 self-reported); Method: 2 identified 28 (22 PEth and 6 self-reported) out of 315 patients (one patient positive for both urine and PEth). The six patients with self-reported use had negative urine and PEth testing. We had fair agreement between the two methods (282 negative and 7 positive; 289/314=92.0%; Kappa 0.32, p<0.001); method 2 identified significantly more women (McNemar, p<0.001). Combining methods: resulted in an alcohol detection rate of 10.2% (32/314).

CONCLUSION:

Method: 2 identified more alcohol users than Method: 1. Combining both methods: identified the most alcohol consumption.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Phosphatidylethanol; Pregnancy

PMID:
28939493
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2017.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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