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PLoS One. 2017 Sep 22;12(9):e0183791. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183791. eCollection 2017.

Cognitive function in patients with stable coronary heart disease: Related cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre (ÉPIC), Montreal Heart Institute and University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
2
Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute and University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
INSERM - U1093 "Cognition, Action, et Plasticité Sensorimotrice", Dijon, France.
5
PERFORM Centre, Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
6
Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
Laboratory, MOVE (EA6314), Faculty of Sport Sciences, Université de Poitiers, Poitiers, France.
8
Montreal Health Innovations Coordinating Center, A Division of the Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

Chronic exercise has been shown to prevent or slow age-related decline in cognitive functions in otherwise healthy, asymptomatic individuals. We sought to assess cognitive function in a stable coronary heart disease (CHD) sample and its relationship to cerebral oxygenation-perfusion, cardiac hemodynamic responses, and [Formula: see text] peak compared to age-matched and young healthy control subjects. Twenty-two young healthy controls (YHC), 20 age-matched old healthy controls (OHC) and 25 patients with stable CHD were recruited. Cognitive function assessment included short term-working memory, perceptual abilities, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory. Maximal cardiopulmonary function (gas exchange analysis), cardiac hemodynamic (impedance cardiography) and left frontal cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (near-infra red spectroscopy) were measured during and after a maximal incremental ergocycle test. Compared to OHC and CHD, YHC had higher [Formula: see text] peak, maximal cardiac index (CI max), cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (ΔO2 Hb, ΔtHb: exercise and recovery) and cognitive function (for all items) (P<0.05). Compared to OHC, CHD patients had lower [Formula: see text] peak, CI max, cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (during recovery) and short term-working memory, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory (P<0.05). [Formula: see text] peak and CI max were related to exercise cerebral oxygenation-perfusion and cognitive function (P<0.005). Cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (exercise) was related to cognitive function (P<0.005). Stable CHD patients have a worse cognitive function, a similar cerebral oxygenation/perfusion during exercise but reduced one during recovery vs. their aged-matched healthy counterparts. In the all sample, cognitive functions correlated with [Formula: see text] peak, CI max and cerebral oxygenation-perfusion.

PMID:
28937981
PMCID:
PMC5609740
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0183791
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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