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Physiother Theory Pract. 2018 Mar;34(3):194-201. doi: 10.1080/09593985.2017.1377331. Epub 2017 Sep 22.

Lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge from hospital in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: A cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
a Department of Physiotherapy , Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska , Gothenburg , Sweden.
2
b Department of Medicine , Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska , Gothenburg , Sweden.
3
c Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Unit of Physiotherapy , Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Gothenburg , Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a cardiovascular disease with symptoms including respiratory associated chest pain (RACP) and dyspnea. No previous studies exist focusing on lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge after PE.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim was to examine and describe lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge in patients with PE and compare to reference values.

PATIENTS/METHODS:

Fifty consecutive patients with PE admitted to the Acute Medical Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, were included. Size of PE was calculated by Qanadli score (QS) percentage (mean QS 33.4% (17.6)). FVC and FEV1 were registered and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) performed at the day of discharge. RACP was rated before and after spirometry/6MWT with the Visual Analogue Scale. Perceived exertion was rated with Borg CR-10 scale. Spirometry and 6MWT results were compared with reference values.

RESULTS:

This study shows that patients with PE have significantly reduced lung function (p < 0.05) and functional capacity (p < 0.001) at discharge compared with reference values. Patients with higher QS percentage were more dyspneic after 6MWT, no other significant differences in lung function or functional capacity were found between the groups. The patients still suffer from RACP (30%) and dyspnea (60%) at discharge.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study indicates that patients with PE have a reduced lung function, reduced functional capacity, and experience respiratory symptoms as pain and dyspnea at discharge. Further studies are needed concerning long-term follow-up of lung function, functional capacity, and symptoms after PE.

KEYWORDS:

Dyspnea; pulmonary embolism; spirometry

PMID:
28937837
DOI:
10.1080/09593985.2017.1377331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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