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Int J Surg. 2017 Nov;47:33-38. doi: 10.1016/j.ijsu.2017.09.018. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

The filling proportion of bone cement affects recollapse of vertebrae after percutaneous vertebral augmentation: A retrospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: sjpfly@163.com.
2
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: lixiangding@hotmail.com.
3
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: chenjiao_majic@163.com.
4
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: drzal24@outlook.com.
5
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: 13810276769@163.com.
6
Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Ninth Clinical Medical College of Peking University, Capital Medical University, China. Electronic address: herozga@aliyun.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between filling proportion of bone cement in the vertical direction and incidence of recollapse in the augmented vertebrae after vertebral augmentation.

METHODS:

Fifty-one patients (51 vertebrae) who had operations between January 2014 and July 2016 with a mean age of 78.10 years were included. All patients in our department of spine surgery were advised to have follow-up care every 6 months. Patients characteristics, radiographic outcomes were evaluated.

RESULTS:

The recollapse of augmented vertebral body occurred in 10 of 51 vertebrae (20%).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with a high proportion rate of bone cement in the middle vertical direction have a low incidence of experiencing recollapse.

KEYWORDS:

Bone cement; Osteoporosis vertebral compression fractures; Radiography; Recollapse; Vertebral augmentation

PMID:
28935530
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijsu.2017.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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