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Diseases. 2017 Aug 18;5(3). pii: E17. doi: 10.3390/diseases5030017.

A Case of Systemic Infection Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes Oral Infection in an Edentulous Patient.

Author information

1
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. 17yumiii@gmail.com.
2
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. abem-ora@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
3
Division for Health Service Promotion, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-003, Japan. abem-ora@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
4
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. rinaki-tky@umin.net.
5
Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing 100142, China. zl20014111@163.com.
6
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. SUENAGAH-ORA@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
7
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. ABET-ORA@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
8
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. HOSHI-ORT@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infections in the oral and maxillofacial region can sometimes extend beyond the oral cavity, with serious consequences. Most oral infections are odontogenic, occurring through the root apex of the tooth or the periodontal pocket. It thus makes sense that edentulous patients have a much lower risk of oral bacterial infection. For this reason, while there are many reports on systemic infections caused by oral infections, few of these describe such infections in edentulous patients.

CASE PRESENTATION:

We present a case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an 89-year-old Japanese edentulous woman. S. pyogenes was detected in the wound of left maxilla and the blood sample. S. pyogenes has been reported to be one of the most common and influential aerobic bacteria associated with deep neck infection and subsequent systemic infection. Left maxillary sinusitis was observed, and this could be the origin of the S. pyogenes infection. S. pyogenes derived from the sinusitis and leaked to the oral cavity might have caused systemic infection through wounding of the oral mucosa. Fortunately, intensive antibiotic therapy was effective, and the patient recovered without any surgical procedures.

CONCLUSIONS:

We experienced a rare case of oral and maxillofacial cellulitis followed by sepsis due to a Streptococcus pyogenes infection in an old edentulous woman. This result indicated that, while edentulous patients are considered to have no risk of odontogenic infection, they still carry a risk of bacterial infection.

KEYWORDS:

Streptococcus pyogenes; bisphosphonates; edentulous patients; myelodysplastic syndromes; oral infection; sepsis

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