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Front Hum Neurosci. 2017 Sep 6;11:446. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00446. eCollection 2017.

Delayed Mismatch Field Latencies in Autism Spectrum Disorder with Abnormal Auditory Sensitivity: A Magnetoencephalographic Study.

Author information

1
Molecular Research Center for Children's Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University Graduate School of MedicineOsaka, Japan.
2
Division of Developmental Neuroscience, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University Graduate School of MedicineOsaka, Japan.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Osaka University Graduate School of MedicineOsaka, Japan.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka University Graduate School of MedicineOsaka, Japan.
5
Endowed Research Department of Clinical Neuroengineering, Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka UniversityOsaka, Japan.

Abstract

Although abnormal auditory sensitivity is the most common sensory impairment associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the neurophysiological mechanisms remain unknown. In previous studies, we reported that this abnormal sensitivity in patients with ASD is associated with delayed and prolonged responses in the auditory cortex. In the present study, we investigated alterations in residual M100 and MMFs in children with ASD who experience abnormal auditory sensitivity. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure MMF elicited by an auditory oddball paradigm (standard tones: 300 Hz, deviant tones: 700 Hz) in 20 boys with ASD (11 with abnormal auditory sensitivity: mean age, 9.62 ± 1.82 years, 9 without: mean age, 9.07 ± 1.31 years) and 13 typically developing boys (mean age, 9.45 ± 1.51 years). We found that temporal and frontal residual M100/MMF latencies were significantly longer only in children with ASD who have abnormal auditory sensitivity. In addition, prolonged residual M100/MMF latencies were correlated with the severity of abnormal auditory sensitivity in temporal and frontal areas of both hemispheres. Therefore, our findings suggest that children with ASD and abnormal auditory sensitivity may have atypical neural networks in the primary auditory area, as well as in brain areas associated with attention switching and inhibitory control processing. This is the first report of an MEG study demonstrating altered MMFs to an auditory oddball paradigm in patients with ASD and abnormal auditory sensitivity. These findings contribute to knowledge of the mechanisms for abnormal auditory sensitivity in ASD, and may therefore facilitate development of novel clinical interventions.

KEYWORDS:

abnormal auditory sensitivity; autism spectrum disorders (ASD); magnetoencephalography (MEG); mismatch fields; oddball paradigm

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