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Support Care Cancer. 2018 Mar;26(3):853-860. doi: 10.1007/s00520-017-3901-7. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Evaluation of an advance care planning web-based resource: applicability for cancer treatment patients.

Author information

1
BC Cancer Agency Sindi Ahluwalia Hawkins Centre for the Southern Interior, 399 Royal Avenue, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y 5L3, Canada.
2
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia Okanagan, ART 132, 1147 Research Road, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1V 1V7, Canada. carole.robinson@ubc.ca.
3
Pain and Symptom Management Palliative Care Program, BC Cancer Agency Sindi Ahluwalia Hawkins Centre for the Southern Interior, 399 Royal Avenue, Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y 5L3, Canada.
4
Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.
5
School of Medicine, San Francisco VA Medical Center, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to explore the acceptability, applicability, and understandability of a promising advance care planning (ACP) web-based resource for use with oncology patients, and determine whether revisions to the website would be necessary before implementation into oncology care. The resource is called PREPARE ( www.prepareforyourcare.org ) and it had not been tested for use within oncology, but had previously been shown to influence the readiness of older, community-dwelling adults to engage in ACP behaviors.

METHODS:

This qualitative descriptive study included participants receiving cancer medications and one participant on watchful waiting post-chemotherapy (n = 21). Data were collected via cognitive interviewing, followed by a brief semi-structured interview to gather a meaningful account of the participants' experience with PREPARE. Content analysis resulted in a comprehensive summary of what participants liked and did not like about the resource, as well as suggestions for change.

RESULTS:

Overall, participants agreed PREPARE was acceptable, applicable, and understandable for cancer patients. A small number of participants had difficulty with the life-limiting language found within the website and this requires follow-up to determine whether the language causes distress or disengagement from ACP. These findings extend our understanding of barriers to engagement in ACP that appear unique to cancer patients receiving active treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results indicated that PREPARE is a reflective, capacity-building ACP resource that was acceptable, applicable, and understandable for use in oncology. These findings offer direction for both research and practice.

KEYWORDS:

Active treatment; Advance care planning; Cancer; Evaluation; Intervention; Oncology

PMID:
28929291
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-017-3901-7

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