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Front Genet. 2017 Sep 4;8:110. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2017.00110. eCollection 2017.

Genetics of Tinnitus: Time to Biobank Phantom Sounds.

Author information

1
Experimental Audiology, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska InstitutetStockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Molecular Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska InstitutetStockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel HillNC, United States.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel HillNC, United States.
5
Otology & Neurotology Group, Department of Genomic Medicine, Pfizer-Universidad de Granada-Junta de Andalucía Centre for Genomics and Oncology Research (GENyO)Granada, Spain.
6
Department of Otolaryngology, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Universidad de GranadaGranada, Spain.

Abstract

Tinnitus is a common phantom sensation resulting most often from sensory deprivation, and for which little knowledge on the molecular mechanisms exists. While the existing evidence for a genetic influence on the condition has been until now sparse and underpowered, recent data suggest that specific forms of tinnitus have a strong genetic component revealing that not all tinnitus percepts are alike, at least in how they are genetically driven. These new findings pave the way for a better understanding on how phantom sensations are molecularly driven and call for international biobanking efforts.

KEYWORDS:

GWAS (genome-wide association study); genetics; heritability; neuropsychiatry; subtype; tinnitus; whole exome sequencing

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