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Front Neurol. 2017 Sep 4;8:463. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2017.00463. eCollection 2017.

Abnormal Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials Predict Evolution of Isolated Recurrent Vertigo into Meniere's Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea.
2
Research Administration Team, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) can be abnormal in patients with idiopathic recurrent spontaneous vertigo. We aimed to determine whether abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) can predict evolution of isolated recurrent vertigo into Meniere's disease (MD).

METHODS:

We had followed up 146 patients with isolated recurrent vertigo and an evaluation of cVEMPs for 0-142 months [median = 6, interquartile range (IQR) = 0-29] at the Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from June 2003 to May 2014. We defined the variables associated with a progression into MD and calculated cumulative progression rates.

RESULTS:

Among the 94 patients with recurrent vertigo and abnormal cVEMPs, 18 (18/94, 19%) showed an evolution into MD while only 2 of the 50 (4%) patients with normal cVEMPs evolved into MD during the follow-up (p = 0.01). The interval between onset of vertigo and development of cochlear symptoms ranged from 1 month to 13.6 years (median = 3 years, IQR = 0.5-4.5 years). Overall, pure tone audiometry (PTA) threshold at 0.25 kHz [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-1.2] and abnormalities of cVEMPs (HR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.3-25.5) were found to be significantly associated with a later conversion into MD. The cumulative progression rate was 12% (95% CI = 5-18) at 1 year, 18% (8-26) at 2 years, and 22% (11-32) at 3 years.

CONCLUSION:

Abnormal cVEMPs may be an indicator for evolution of isolated recurrent vertigo into MD. Patients with isolated recurrent vertigo may be better managed conforming to MD when cVEMPs are abnormal.

KEYWORDS:

Meniere’s disease; hearing loss; nystagmus; tinnitus; vertigo; vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials

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