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J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Dec 1;18(12):1010-1018.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2017.07.014. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

Consensus Approaches to Identify Incident Dementia in Cohort Studies: Systematic Review and Approach in the Successful Aging after Elective Surgery Study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA.
4
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
6
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
9
Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA; Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
10
Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA; Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address: tfong@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To survey the current methods used to ascertain dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in longitudinal cohort studies, to categorize differences in approaches and to identify key components of expert panel methodology in current use.

METHODS:

We searched PubMed for the past 10 years, from March 6, 2007 to March 6, 2017 using a combination of controlled vocabulary and keyword terms to identify expert panel consensus methods used to diagnose MCI or dementia in large cohort studies written in English. From these results, we identified a framework for reporting standards and describe as an exemplar the clinical consensus procedure used in an ongoing study of elective surgery patients (the Successful Aging after Elective Surgery study).

RESULTS:

Thirty-one articles representing unique cohorts were included. Among published methods, membership of experts panel varied significantly. There was more similarity in what types of information was use to ascertain disease status. However, information describing the diagnostic decision process and resolution of disagreements was often lacking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Methods used for expert panel diagnosis of MCI and dementia in large cohort studies are widely variable, and there is a need for more standardized reporting of these approaches. By describing the procedure in which our expert panel achieved consensus diagnoses, we hope to encourage the development and publication of well-founded and reproducible methods for diagnosis of MCI and dementia in longitudinal studies.

KEYWORDS:

Consensus; dementia; diagnosis; mild cognitive impairment

PMID:
28927945
PMCID:
PMC5701828
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamda.2017.07.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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