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Acad Pediatr. 2017 Sep 16. pii: S1876-2859(17)30489-8. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.09.009. [Epub ahead of print]

Gaming the System: Creation of a Random Case-Generating Game for Use in Morning Report.

Author information

1
Work completed while a Chief Resident at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital; Now a primary care pediatrician at: Clinicas del Camino Real, Ventura, CA, 725 S Bixel Street, Apt 407B Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: pallavikamra@gmail.com.
2
University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, 6th Floor East Building, 6532450 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55454 USA. Electronic address: borm0029@umn.edu.
3
University of Minnesota, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Minneapolis, MN, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA. Electronic address: zhangl@umn.edu.
4
University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, 6th Floor East Building, M6532450 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55454 USA. Electronic address: mbpitt@umn.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Case-based morning reports are a staple of residency education. Little is known about the role of game-based learning in facilitating case-based discussions.

OBJECTIVES:

Compare an educational game that can be used for creating impromptu case-based sessions to traditional morning report.

METHODS:

We created a game called Differential Diagnosis Slot Machine, which allows participants to quickly generate theoretical cases for discussion.Five traditional morning report (TMR) and game-based morning report (GBMR) sessions were conducted. Participants completed an anonymous survey after each session rating their learning, enjoyment, participation, and desire for similar future sessions. Learners also described who they learned from during the session. Two-group comparison was done using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Statistical significance was determined at p < 0.05.

RESULTS:

All participants (61 in each type of session) completed the survey. Learners were more likely to respond with '5' or 'strongly agree', for the GBMR, with statistically significant difference in all but self-rated learning category. While nearly all of the learners in the TMR sessions (93.4%) indicated that they learned most from the facilitator, responses from the GBMR session had a wider variation with 72.1% indicating residents, and 11.5% choosing medical students (p<0.01).

CONCLUSION:

The game-based morning report was rated as equivalent or better than traditional morning report in all self-rated categories. It also allowed for more peer-directed learning and as it encourages creative problem solving may be a useful adjunct for case-based teaching.

KEYWORDS:

game-based learning; morning report; resident medical education

PMID:
28927941
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2017.09.009
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