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Clin Nutr. 2018 Aug;37(4):1121-1132. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2017.08.016. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Does nutrition play a role in the prevention and management of sarcopenia?

Author information

1
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK.
2
Department of Public Health, Epidemiology, and Health Economics, University of Liège, Quartier Hôpital, Liège, Belgium.
3
Division of Bone Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva 14, Switzerland.
4
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.
5
Institute for Health and Aging, Catholic University of Australia, Melbourne, Australia; University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK.
6
Gerontology and Frailty in Ageing Research Department, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels, Belgium.
7
Department of Geriatrics and Aging Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
8
Gérontopôle, University Hospital of Toulouse, Toulouse, France; INSERM UMR1027, University of Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.
9
Bone Metabolism Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, USA.
11
Department of Endocrinology, Unit for Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
12
Department of Geriatrics, Neurosciences and Orthopedics, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Rome, Milano, Italy.
13
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; Department of Geriatrics, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
14
Gérontopôle de Toulouse, Institut du Vieillissement, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Toulouse (CHU Toulouse), UMR INSERM 1027, University of Toulouse III, Toulouse, France.
15
NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
16
Gérontopôle, CHU Toulouse, Service de Médecine Interne et Gérontologie Clinique, 170 Avenue de Casselardit, 31059 Toulouse, France.
17
Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
18
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK; National Institute for Health Research Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LE, UK. Electronic address: cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk.

Abstract

There is a growing body of evidence that links nutrition to muscle mass, strength and function in older adults, suggesting that it has an important role to play both in the prevention and management of sarcopenia. This review summarises the discussions of a working group [ESCEO working group meeting 8th September 2016] that met to review current evidence and to consider its implications for preventive and treatment strategies. The review points to the importance of 'healthier' dietary patterns that are adequate in quality in older age, to ensure sufficient intakes of protein, vitamin D, antioxidant nutrients and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. In particular, there is substantial evidence to support the roles of dietary protein and physical activity as key anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. However, much of the evidence is observational and from high-income countries. Further high-quality trials, particularly from more diverse populations, are needed to enable an understanding of dose and duration effects of individual nutrients on function, to elucidate mechanistic links, and to define optimal profiles and patterns of nutrient intake for older adults.

KEYWORDS:

Muscle mass; Muscle strength; Nutrition; Physical performance; Sarcopenia; Supplementation

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