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Ann Epidemiol. 2017 Sep;27(9):575-582.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.08.010. Epub 2017 Aug 15.

Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

Author information

1
Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Ann Arbor.
2
Independent, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Ann Arbor. Electronic address: bfoxman@umich.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC), multiple episodes of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; vaginal yeast infection) within a 12-month period, adversely affects quality of life, mental health, and sexual activity. Diagnosis is not straightforward, as VVC is defined by the combination of often nonspecific vaginal symptoms and the presence of yeast-which is a common vaginal commensal. Estimating the incidence and prevalence is challenging: most VVC is diagnosed and treated empirically, the availability for purchase of effective therapies over the counter enables self-diagnosis and treatment, and the duration of the relatively benign VVC symptoms is short, introducing errors into any estimates relying on medical records or patient recall.

METHODS:

We evaluate current estimates of VVC and RVVC and provide new prevalence estimates using data from a 2011 seven-country (n = 7345) internet panel survey on VVC conducted by Ipsos Health (https://www.ipsos.com/en). We also evaluate information on VVC-associated visits using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

RESULTS:

The estimated probability of VVC by age 50 varied widely by country (from 23% to 49%, mean 39%), as did the estimated probability of RVVC after VVC (from 14% to 28%, mean 23%).

CONCLUSIONS:

However estimated, the probability of RVVC was high suggesting RVVC is a common condition.

KEYWORDS:

Diagnosis; Incidence; Prevalence; Recurrent; Vulvovaginal candidiasis

PMID:
28927765
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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