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J Natl Cancer Inst. 2018 Jan 1;110(1). doi: 10.1093/jnci/djx123.

Comprehensive Intrametastatic Immune Quantification and Major Impact of Immunoscore on Survival.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Integrative Cancer Immunology, INSERM, UMRS1138, Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMRS1138, Paris, France; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France; Inovarion, Paris, France; Department of Medical Oncology, Cliniques Universitaires St-Luc and Institut de Recherche Clinique et Experimentale (Pole MIRO), Institut Roi Albert II, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Immunology, HEGP, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris, France; AstraZeneca, Cambridge, UK; Departments of General and Digestive Surgery, HEGP, AP-HP, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris, France; Grand Hopital de Charleroi, Charleroi, Belgium.

Abstract

Background:

This study assesses how the metastatic immune landscape is impacting the response to treatment and the outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.

Methods:

Complete curative resection of metastases (n = 441) was performed for two patient cohorts (n = 153). Immune densities were quantified in the center and invasive margin of all metastases. Immunoscore and T and B cell (TB) score were analyzed in relation to radiological and pathological responses and patient's disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results:

The spatial distribution of immune cells within metastases was nonuniform. Patients, as well as metastases of the same patient, had variable immune infiltrates and response to therapy. A beneficial response was statistically significantly associated with increased immune densities. Among all metastases, Immunoscore (I) and TB score evaluated in the least immune-infiltrated metastases were the strongest predictors for DFS and OS (five-year follow-up, Immunoscore: I 3-4: DFS rate = 27.9%, 95% CI = 15.2 to 51.3; vs I 0-1-2: DFS rate = 12.3%, 95% CI = 4.9 to 30.6; HR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.28 to 0.70, P = .02; I 3-4: OS rate = 64.6%, 95% CI = 46.6 to 89.6; vs I 0-1-2: OS rate = 32.5%, 95% CI = 17.2 to 61.4; HR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.66, P = .001, C-index = 65.9%; five-year follow-up, TB score: TB 3-4: DFS rate = 25.7%, 95% CI = 14.2 to 46.6; vs TB 0-1-2: DFS rate = 5.0%, 95% CI = 0.8 to 32.4; HR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.57, P < .001; TB 3-4: OS rate = 63.7%, 95% CI = 46.4 to 87.5; vs TB 0-1-2: OS rate: 21.4%, 95% CI = 9.2 to 49.8; HR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.51, P < .001, C-index = 67.8%). High TB score and Immunoscore patients had a median survival of 70.5 months, while low patients survived only 25.1 to 38.3 months. Nonresponding patients with high-immune infiltrates had prolonged DFS (HR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.52, P = .001) and OS (HR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.1 to 0.62, P = .001). The immune parameters remained the only statistically significant prognostic factor associated with DFS and OS in multivariable analysis (P < .001), while response to treatment was not.

Conclusions:

Response to treatment and prolonged survival of metastatic CRC patients were statistically significantly associated with high-immune densities quantified into the least immune-infiltrated metastasis.

PMID:
28922789
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/djx123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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