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Int J Cancer. 2018 Jan 15;142(2):262-270. doi: 10.1002/ijc.31058. Epub 2017 Oct 4.

Anti-Müllerian hormone and risk of ovarian cancer in nine cohorts.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
2
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
4
Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine and Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
5
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
7
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
8
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
9
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.
10
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.
11
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA.
12
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Cancer, Heidelberg, Germany.
13
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.
14
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
15
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, China.
16
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
17
Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
18
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
19
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, and Public Health and Clinical Medicine: Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
20
Department of Epidemiology, UMC Utrecht Julius Center, Uretcht, The Netherlands.
21
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
22
Department of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.
23
Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
24
Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
25
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy.
26
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
27
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
28
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
29
WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
30
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
31
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Bringham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
32
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
33
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway.
34
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
35
Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

Animal and experimental data suggest that anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) serves as a marker of ovarian reserve and inhibits the growth of ovarian tumors. However, few epidemiologic studies have examined the association between AMH and ovarian cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study of 302 ovarian cancer cases and 336 matched controls from nine cohorts. Prediagnostic blood samples of premenopausal women were assayed for AMH using a picoAMH enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. AMH concentration was not associated with overall ovarian cancer risk. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI), comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of AMH, was 0.99 (0.59-1.67) (Ptrend : 0.91). The association did not differ by age at blood draw or oral contraceptive use (all Pheterogeneity : ≥0.26). There also was no evidence for heterogeneity of risk for tumors defined by histologic developmental pathway, stage, and grade, and by age at diagnosis and time between blood draw and diagnosis (all Pheterogeneity : ≥0.39). In conclusion, this analysis of mostly late premenopausal women from nine cohorts does not support the hypothesized inverse association between prediagnostic circulating levels of AMH and risk of ovarian cancer.

KEYWORDS:

anti-Müllerian hormone; epidemiology; ovarian cancer; ovarian function

PMID:
28921520
PMCID:
PMC5749630
[Available on 2019-01-15]
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.31058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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