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Clin Chim Acta. 2017 Nov;474:120-123. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2017.09.010. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Human platelet antigens are associated with febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Electronic address: a12048@adm.cgmh.org.tw.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
5
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
6
Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) is the most common type of transfusion reactions, and it could be reduced by transfusing patients with leukocyte-poor blood products. However, FNHTR still occur in certain patients transfused with leukocyte-poor red blood cell (LPR) products. It is examined whether human platelet antigen (HPA) could be a potential membrane antigen that plays a role in FNHTR.

METHODS:

A total of 120 inpatient subjects who transfused with LPR (60 in FNHTR group, 60 in control group) were typed for HPA-2, HPA-3, and HPA-15 using sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) and electrophoresis.

RESULTS:

HPA-2 unmatched rate between donors and patients in FNHTR group was 18%, and only 3% unmatched rate was observed in control group (p=0.0082). FNHTR group was further classified according to the imputability. There was a significant difference (p=0.0041) between FNHTR (probable imputability, infection) group and control group, and more significant difference (p=0.0008) was seen between FNHTR (probable imputability, febrile neutropenia) group and control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Those results indicated that HPA-2 might play roles on inducing FNHTR in patients suffering from infectious diseases and febrile neutropenia. HPA-2 genotyping between donors and recipients might be worth integrating in pre-transfusion testing to increase transfusion safety.

KEYWORDS:

Febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR); Human platelet antigen (HPA); Leukocyte-poor red blood cell (LPR); Sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR)

PMID:
28919492
DOI:
10.1016/j.cca.2017.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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