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Acad Pediatr. 2018 Mar;18(2):161-165. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.09.003. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Blood and Hair Aluminum Levels, Vaccine History, and Early Infant Development: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Author information

1
Pediatric Environmental Health Center, Boston, Mass; Region 1 New England Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, Boston, Mass; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
2
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
3
Boston Children's Primary Care at Longwood, Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
4
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
5
Department of Pharmacy, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
6
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
7
Pediatric Environmental Health Center, Boston, Mass; Region 1 New England Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, Boston, Mass; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: alan.woolf@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate relationships between whole blood (B-Al) and hair aluminum (H-Al) levels in healthy infants and their immunization history and development.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 9- to 13-month-old children recruited from an urban primary care center, excluding those with a history of renal disease or receipt of either aluminum-containing pharmaceuticals or parenteral nutrition. Aluminum levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Correlation with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID) and vaccine-related aluminum load was assessed via linear regression models.

RESULTS:

The median age of 85 participants was 287 days. B-Al (median, 15.4 ng/mL; range, 0.9-952 ng/mL) and H-Al (median 42,542 ng/g; range, 2758-211,690 ng/g) were weakly correlated (Spearman ρ = 0.26; P = .03). There was no significant correlation between B-Al or H-Al and estimated aluminum load from vaccines. B-Al was not correlated with BSID composite or subscale scores. Although H-Al was not correlated with BSID scores in models including all data (n = 85), it was inversely correlated with motor composite (P < .02; Wald = 5.88) and the gross motor subscale (P = .04; Wald = 4.38) in models that excluded an extreme outlying H-Al value.

CONCLUSIONS:

Infant B-Al and H-Al varied considerably but did not correlate with their immunization history. Likewise, there was no correlation between B-Al and infant development or between H-Al and language or cognitive development. An inverse correlation between H-Al and BSID motor scores deserves further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

aluminum biomarkers; aluminum toxicity; immunizations; metals toxicity; neurodevelopment; vaccines

PMID:
28919482
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2017.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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