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Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2017 Sep;48:32-36. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.06.003. Epub 2017 Jun 7.

Description of a multi-university education and collaborative care child psychiatry access program: New York State's CAP PC.

Author information

1
University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, United States. Electronic address: dlkaye@buffalo.edu.
2
Hofstra/Northwell Health School of Medicine, Glen Oaks, NY, United States.
3
University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY, United States.
4
SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, United States.
5
Columbia University Medical Center/NY State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, United States.
6
University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY, United States.
7
REACH Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AK, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although, child mental health problems are widespread, few get adequate treatment, and there is a severe shortage of child psychiatrists. To address this public health need many states have adopted collaborative care programs to assist primary care to better assess and manage pediatric mental health concerns. This report adds to the small literature on collaborative care programs and describes one large program that covers most of New York state.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

CAP PC, a component program of New York State's Office of Mental Health (OMH) Project TEACH, has provided education and consultation support to primary care providers covering most of New York state since 2010. The program is uniquely a five medical school collaboration with hubs at each that share one toll free number and work together to provide education and consultation support services to PCPs.

METHODS:

The program developed a clinical communications record to track information about all consultations which forms the basis of much of this report. 2-week surveys following consultations, annual surveys, and pre- and post-educational program evaluations have also been used to measure the success of the program.

RESULTS:

CAP PC has grown over the 6years of the program and has provided 8013 phone consultations to over 1500 PCPs. The program synergistically provided 17,523 CME credits of educational programming to 1200 PCPs. PCP users of the program report very high levels of satisfaction and self reported growth in confidence.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAP PC demonstrates that large-scale collaborative consultation models for primary care are feasible to implement, popular with PCPs, and can be sustained. The program supports increased access to child mental health services in primary care and provides child psychiatric expertise for patients who would otherwise have none.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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