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Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2017 Oct;118:27-41. doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2017.08.008. Epub 2017 Aug 26.

Distance-delivered physical activity interventions for childhood cancer survivors: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: d.mizrahi@unsw.edu.au.
2
Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, Australia.
3
Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
4
School of Medical Sciences, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, USA.

Abstract

This review aimed to determine the feasibility of distance-delivered physical activity (PA) interventions in childhood cancer survivors (CCS), and assess the effect on PA levels, and physical, physiological and psychological outcomes. We searched electronic databases until May 2016, including studies following intensive treatment. Meta-analyses were conducted on randomized controlled trials. We calculated the effect of interventions on PA levels and physical, physiological and psychological health outcomes. Thirteen studies (n=270 participants) were included in the systematic review and four (n=102 participants) in the meta-analysis. Most studies used telephone to deliver interventions with contact (1/day-1/month), duration (2 weeks-1year) and timing (maintenance therapy->20years following intensive treatment) varying between interventions. Interventions yielded a mean recruitment rate=64%, retention rate=85% and adherence rate=88%. Interventions did not increase PA levels (p=0.092), but had a positive effect on physical function (p=0.008) and psychological outcomes (p=0.006). Distance-delivered PA interventions are feasible in CCS. Despite not increasing PA levels, participation may improve physical and psychological health; however, larger randomized controlled trials are warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood cancer survivor; Distance-delivery intervention; Exercise; Physical activity

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