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Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Oct 15;123(1-2):175-181. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.08.065. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Boat anchoring pressure on coastal seabed: Quantification and bias estimation using AIS data.

Author information

1
Andromède Océanologie, 7 Place Cassan, 34280 Carnon, France; UMR 5554 - ISEM, Campus triolet de l'Université Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France. Electronic address: julie.deter@andromede-ocean.com.
2
Andromède Océanologie, 7 Place Cassan, 34280 Carnon, France.
3
Andromède Océanologie, 7 Place Cassan, 34280 Carnon, France; UMR 5554 - ISEM, Campus triolet de l'Université Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France.
4
Agence de l'eau Rhône-Méditerranée-Corse, Immeuble le Noailles, 62 La Canebière, 13001 Marseille, France.

Abstract

Global shipping is economically important, but has many adverse environmental effects. Anchoring contributes greatly to this adverse impact, as it is responsible for mechanical disturbance of highly sensitive marine habitats. Recovery of these ecosystems is limited by slow regrowth. Anchoring pressure on coastal seabed habitats was estimated using AIS (Automatic Identification System) data along 1800km of Mediterranean coastline between 2010 and 2015. A comparison with field observations showed that these results were most consistent for large boats (>50m). An analysis of AIS data coupled with a seabed map showed that around 30% of the habitats between 0 and -80m exhibited anchoring pressure. Posidonia oceanica seagrass beds were the most impacted habitat in terms of duration. This methodology efficiently estimates spatial and temporal anchoring pressure principally due to large boats and should interest managers of marine protected areas as much as coastline managers.

KEYWORDS:

Benthic habitats; Habitat vulnerability; Method; Mooring impact; Resilience; Ship

PMID:
28916347
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.08.065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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