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BMC Gastroenterol. 2017 Sep 15;17(1):104. doi: 10.1186/s12876-017-0659-9.

Association between polymorphisms of TAS2R16 and susceptibility to colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Via Derna 1, 56100, Pisa, Italy.
2
Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.
3
Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
4
Biomedical Centre, Medical School Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
6
Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
8
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), IDIBELL, CIBERESP and Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
9
Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy.
10
Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Via Derna 1, 56100, Pisa, Italy. stefano.landi@unipi.it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genetics plays an important role in the susceptibility to sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). In the last 10 years genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 independent low penetrance polymorphic variants. However, these loci only explain around 1‑4% of CRC heritability, highlighting the dire need of identifying novel risk loci. In this study, we focused our attention on the genetic variability of the TAS2R16 gene, encoding for one of the bitter taste receptors that selectively binds to salicin, a natural antipyretic that resembles aspirin. Given the importance of inflammation in CRC, we tested whether polymorphic variants in this gene could affect the risk of developing this neoplasia hypothesizing a role of TAS2R16 in modulating chronic inflammation within the gut.

METHODS:

We performed an association study using 6 tagging SNPs, (rs860170, rs978739, rs1357949, rs1525489, rs6466849, rs10268496) that cover all TAS2R16 genetic variability. The study was carried out on 1902 CRC cases and 1532 control individuals from four European countries.

RESULTS:

We did not find any statistically significant association between risk of developing CRC and selected SNPs. However, after stratification by histology (colon vs. rectum) we found that rs1525489 was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer with a (Ptrend of = 0.0071).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that polymorphisms within TAS2R16 gene do not have a strong influence on colon cancer susceptibility, but a possible role in rectal cancer should be further evaluated in larger cohorts.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer risk; Colon cancer; Colorectal cancer; Genetic association study; Polymorphisms; Rectal cancer; TAS2R16; Taste receptors

PMID:
28915899
PMCID:
PMC5603047
DOI:
10.1186/s12876-017-0659-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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