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PLoS One. 2017 Sep 15;12(9):e0184887. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184887. eCollection 2017.

The biometric antecedents to happiness.

Author information

1
Turku School of Economics, Turku, Finland.
2
Labour Institute for Economic Research, Helsinki, Finland.
3
IZA, Bonn, Germany.
4
UCL Department of Social Science, London, United Kingdom.
5
NIESR, London, United Kingdom.
6
Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Jyväskylä, Finland.
7
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
8
Unit of Psychology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
9
Department of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
10
Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
11
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
12
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

It has been suggested that biological markers are associated with human happiness. We contribute to the empirical literature by examining the independent association between various aspects of biometric wellbeing measured in childhood and happiness in adulthood. Using Young Finns Study data (n = 1905) and nationally representative linked data we examine whether eight biomarkers measured in childhood (1980) are associated with happiness in adulthood (2001). Using linked data we account for a very rich set of confounders including age, sex, body size, family background, nutritional intake, physical activity, income, education and labour market experiences. We find that there is a negative relationship between triglycerides and subjective well-being but it is both gender- and age-specific and the relationship does not prevail using the later measurements (1983/1986) on triglycerides. In summary, we conclude that none of the eight biomarkers measured in childhood predict happiness robustly in adulthood.

PMID:
28915269
PMCID:
PMC5600384
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0184887
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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