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Int Urol Nephrol. 2017 Dec;49(12):2157-2165. doi: 10.1007/s11255-017-1701-0. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Novel pericatheter retrograde urethrogram technique is a viable method for postoperative urethroplasty imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Pasquerilla Healthcare Center Fourth Floor, Washington, DC, 20007, USA. sussman.rachael@gmail.com.
2
Department of Urology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Pasquerilla Healthcare Center Fourth Floor, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.
3
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
4
MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to describe our technique for pericatheter retrograde urethrogram (pcRUG) and to evaluate the utility of a pcRUG to detect a clinically significant leak after urethral reconstruction.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed our prospective IRB-approved database of patients undergoing urethral reconstruction. pcRUG was performed at 3-4 weeks after surgery, in standardized fashion. Patients were placed in oblique position, and with the penis stretched, diluted contrast was instilled via an angiocatheter alongside the indwelling urethral catheter under dynamic fluoroscopy. The image was then evaluated for the presence of any contrast extravasation. Patient with and without extravasation seen on initial pcRUG were compared.

RESULTS:

From September 2012 through February 2017, 144 pericatheter retrograde urethrograms were performed on 130 patients. 115 patients (88.5%) had no extravasation on pcRUG. Fifteen patients (11.5%) demonstrated extravasation, with 13 of those patients (10%) undergoing a repeat pcRUG. Patients with extravasation seen on initial pcRUG were more likely to have strictures that were panurethral (36 vs. 9%, p = 0.029) and ≥10 cm (43 vs. 11%, p = 0.016). One patient (0.8%) presented with urinary leak and scrotal abscess after a urethra was assessed as sufficiently healed at the initial pcRUG and the catheter removed. There were otherwise no infectious or procedural complications related to pericatheter retrograde urethrogram.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our pericatheter retrograde urethrogram technique is a safe and reproducible technique to effectively assess urethral healing after urethroplasty and determine timing of catheter removal. The pcRUG is minimally invasive and is comparable in accuracy and sensitivity to voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography that have traditionally been used to assess healing after urethroplasty.

KEYWORDS:

Male voiding dysfunction; Radiology; Urethral stricture; Urethroplasty

PMID:
28913706
DOI:
10.1007/s11255-017-1701-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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