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Postgrad Med J. 2018 Feb;94(1108):104-108. doi: 10.1136/postgradmedj-2017-135097. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Invitations received from potential predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences: a 12-month early-career researcher experience.

Author information

1
Département de Médecine Familiale et Médecine d'Urgence, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
2
Axe Santé des Populations et Pratiques Optimales en Santé, Unité de recherche en Traumatologie - Urgence - Soins Intensifs, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
3
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY:

This study aims to describe all unsolicited electronic invitations received from potential predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences over a 12-month period following the first publication as a corresponding author of a junior academician.

STUDY DESIGN:

Unsolicited invitations received at an institutional email address and perceived to be sent by predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences were collected.

RESULTS:

A total of 502 invitations were included of which 177 (35.3%) had subject matter relevant to the recipient's research interests and previous work. Two hundred and thirty-seven were invitations to publish a manuscript. Few disclosed the publication fees (32, 13.5%) but they frequently reported accepting all types of manuscripts (167, 70.5%) or emphasised on a deadline to submit (165, 69.6%). Invitations came from 39 publishers (range 1 to 87 invitations per publisher). Two hundred and ten invitations from a potential fraudulent conference were received. These meetings were held in Europe (97, 46.2%), North America (65, 31.0%), Asia (20.4%) or other continents (5, 2.4%) and came from 18 meeting organisation groups (range 1 to 137 invitations per organisation). Becoming an editorial board member (30), the editor-in-chief (1), a guest editor for journal special issue (6) and write a book chapter (11) were some of the roles offered in the other invitations included while no invitation to review a manuscript was received.

CONCLUSIONS:

Young researchers are commonly exposed to predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences following a single publication as a corresponding author. Academic institutions worldwide need to educate and inform young researchers of this emerging problem.

KEYWORDS:

dissemination of research; predatory conferences; predatory journals; publication ethic; young researcher

PMID:
28912190
PMCID:
PMC5800329
DOI:
10.1136/postgradmedj-2017-135097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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