Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2017 Oct 6;358(6359):119-122. doi: 10.1126/science.aal4671. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Mitotic transcription and waves of gene reactivation during mitotic exit.

Author information

1
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-5157, USA.
2
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-5157, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Tulane Center for Aging, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
4
The Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
5
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
6
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
7
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-5157, USA. zaret@upenn.edu.

Abstract

Although the genome is generally thought to be transcriptionally silent during mitosis, technical limitations have prevented sensitive mapping of transcription during mitosis and mitotic exit. Thus, the means by which the interphase expression pattern is transduced to daughter cells have been unclear. We used 5-ethynyluridine to pulse-label transcripts during mitosis and mitotic exit and found that many genes exhibit transcription during mitosis, as confirmed with fluorescein isothiocyanate-uridine 5'-triphosphate labeling, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The first round of transcription immediately after mitosis primarily activates genes involved in the growth and rebuilding of daughter cells, rather than cell type-specific functions. We propose that the cell's transcription pattern is largely retained at a low level through mitosis, whereas the amplitude of transcription observed in interphase is reestablished during mitotic exit.

PMID:
28912132
PMCID:
PMC5727891
DOI:
10.1126/science.aal4671
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center