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J Clin Epidemiol. 2017 Nov;91:23-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Living systematic review: 1. Introduction-the why, what, when, and how.

Author information

1
Cochrane Australia, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 4th Floor, 553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash University and Alfred Hospital, 53 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia. Electronic address: julian.elliott@monash.edu.
2
Cochrane Australia, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 4th Floor, 553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Centre for Health Communication and Participation, School of Psychology and Public Health, Level 4, Health Sciences 2, Science Drive, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086, Australia.
3
Cochrane Australia, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 4th Floor, 553 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
4
Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, A/B Block, Alcuin College, University of York, York YO10 5DD, York, UK.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut, Office Gefinor Center Block B, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, American University of Beirut, Office Gefinor Center Block B, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
6
Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Finkenhubelweg 11, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
7
Cochrane Germany, Medical Center-University of Freiburg, Breisacher Str. 153, 79110 Freiburg, Germany.
8
Cochrane Editorial Unit, Cochrane, St Albans House, 57-59 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4QX, UK.
9
EPPI-Centre, Institute of Education, University College London, 18 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0NR, UK.

Abstract

Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed "Living systematic review" (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.

KEYWORDS:

Evidence synthesis; Guidelines; Living guidelines; Living systematic review; Systematic review

PMID:
28912002
DOI:
10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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