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J Environ Manage. 2017 Dec 15;204(Pt 1):383-393. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.09.014. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Soil microbial community responses to acid exposure and neutralization treatment.

Author information

1
Resource Recovery Research Center, Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 34132, Republic of Korea; Department of Resource Recycling, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34113, Republic of Korea.
2
Groundwater & Ecohydrology Research Center, Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 34132, Republic of Korea; Department of Geology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, 24341, Republic of Korea.
3
Resource Recovery Research Center, Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 34132, Republic of Korea.
4
Groundwater & Ecohydrology Research Center, Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 34132, Republic of Korea; Department of Mineral & Groundwater Resources, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34113, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Mineral & Groundwater Resources, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34113, Republic of Korea; Center for HLW Geological Disposal, Climate Change Mitigation and Sustainability Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 34132, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sphyun@kigam.re.kr.

Abstract

Changes in microbial community induced by acid shock were studied in the context of potential release of acids to the environment due to chemical accidents. The responses of microbial communities in three different soils to the exposure to sulfuric or hydrofluoric acid and to the subsequent neutralization treatment were investigated as functions of acid concentration and exposure time by using 16S-rRNA gene based pyrosequencing and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). Measurements of soil pH and dissolved ion concentrations revealed that the added acids were neutralized to different degrees, depending on the mineral composition and soil texture. Hydrofluoric acid was more effectively neutralized by the soils, compared with sulfuric acid at the same normality. Gram-negative ß-Proteobacteria were shown to be the most acid-sensitive bacterial strains, while spore-forming Gram-positive Bacilli were the most acid-tolerant. The results of this study suggest that the Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacterial ratio may serve as an effective bio-indicator in assessing the impact of the acid shock on the microbial community. Neutralization treatments helped recover the ratio closer to their original values. The findings of this study show that microbial community changes as well as geochemical changes such as pH and dissolved ion concentrations need to be considered in estimating the impact of an acid spill, in selecting an optimal remediation strategy, and in deciding when to end remedial actions at the acid spill impacted site.

KEYWORDS:

Acid shock; Bio-indicator; Chemical spill; Neutralization treatment; Soil microbial community

PMID:
28910736
DOI:
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.09.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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