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Can J Public Health. 2017 Sep 14;108(3):e325-e327. doi: 10.17269/CJPH.108.6075.

Between a rock and a hard place: Prescription opioid restrictions in the time of fentanyl and other street drug adulterants.

Author information

1
Simon Fraser University, Research Associate, Urban Health Research Initiative, B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada. tcheng@cfenet.ubc.ca.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. tcheng@cfenet.ubc.ca.
3
Simon Fraser University, Research Associate, Urban Health Research Initiative, B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada.
4
School of Public Policy, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Abstract

Non-medical prescription opioid use (NMPOU) has increased alarmingly across Canada and resulted in strict prescribing restrictions on opioids. Despite a clear need to reduce opioid prescriptions in response to this crisis, few other policies have been implemented and this singular focus is incongruent with the known characteristics of substance use disorders, negative effects of supply reduction policies, and realities of pain management. Given the recent rise of fentanyl and other dangerous adulterants in street drugs, this commentary argues that a comprehensive response to NMPOU that includes improvements to addiction management and harm-reduction services is urgently needed.

PMID:
28910257
DOI:
10.17269/CJPH.108.6075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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