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Nature. 2017 Sep 13;549(7671):219-226. doi: 10.1038/nature23884.

The 4D nucleome project.

Author information

1
Program in Systems Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA.
2
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801, USA.
3
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.
4
Department of Bioengineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.
5
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain and Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA.
7
Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.
8
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.
9
Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
10
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla California 92093, USA.
11
Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.
12
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.

Erratum in

Abstract

The 4D Nucleome Network aims to develop and apply approaches to map the structure and dynamics of the human and mouse genomes in space and time with the goal of gaining deeper mechanistic insights into how the nucleus is organized and functions. The project will develop and benchmark experimental and computational approaches for measuring genome conformation and nuclear organization, and investigate how these contribute to gene regulation and other genome functions. Validated experimental technologies will be combined with biophysical approaches to generate quantitative models of spatial genome organization in different biological states, both in cell populations and in single cells.

PMID:
28905911
PMCID:
PMC5617335
DOI:
10.1038/nature23884
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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