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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Jan;72(1):124-129. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2017.134. Epub 2017 Sep 13.

A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Kungälv's Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden.
2
Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
3
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
5
Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
6
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
7
Mölnlycke Health Care Center, Mölnlycke, Sweden.
8
Deparment of Endocrinology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Different diets are used for weight loss. A Paleolithic-type diet (PD) has beneficial metabolic effects, but two of the largest iodine sources, table salt and dairy products, are excluded. The objectives of this study were to compare 24-h urinary iodine concentration (24-UIC) in subjects on PD with 24-UIC in subjects on a diet according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) and to study if PD results in a higher risk of developing iodine deficiency (ID), than NNR diet.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

A 2-year prospective randomized trial in a tertiary referral center where healthy postmenopausal overweight or obese women were randomized to either PD (n=35) or NNR diet (n=35). Dietary iodine intake, 24-UIC, 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-UIE), free thyroxin (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Completeness of urine sampling was monitored by para-aminobenzoic acid and salt intake by urinary sodium.

RESULTS:

At baseline, median 24-UIC (71.0 μg/l) and 24-UIE (134.0 μg/d) were similar in the PD and NNR groups. After 6 months, 24-UIC had decreased to 36.0 μg/l (P=0.001) and 24-UIE to 77.0 μg/d (P=0.001) in the PD group; in the NNR group, levels were unaltered. FT4, TSH and FT3 were similar in both groups, except for FT3 at 6 months being lower in PD than in NNR group.

CONCLUSIONS:

A PD results in a higher risk of developing ID, than a diet according to the NNR. Therefore, we suggest iodine supplementation should be considered when on a PD.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00692536.

PMID:
28901333
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2017.134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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