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Fish Physiol Biochem. 2018 Feb;44(1):143-162. doi: 10.1007/s10695-017-0420-x. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Comparative nutritional value of Jatropha curcas protein isolate and soy protein isolate in common carp.

Author information

1
Institute of Organic Agriculture, Department of Livestock Sciences, 5070, Frick, Switzerland.
2
Institute of Organic Agriculture, Department of Livestock Sciences, 5070, Frick, Switzerland. Vikas.kumar@kysu.edu.
3
Division of Aquaculture, College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY, 40601, USA. Vikas.kumar@kysu.edu.
4
Department of Aquaculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Abstract

Jatropha seed cake (JSC) is an excellent source of protein but does contain some antinutritional factors (ANF) that can act as toxins and thus negatively affect the growth and health status of fish. While this can limit the use of JSC, detoxified Jatropha protein isolate (DJPI) may be a better option. An 8-week study was performed to evaluate dietary DJPI to common carp Cyprinus carpio. Five iso-nitrogenous diets (crude protein of 38%) were formulated that consisted of a C ontrol (fish meal (FM) based protein), J 50 or J 75 (50 and 75% of FM protein replaced by DJPI), and S 50 or S 75 (50 and 75% of FM protein replaced by soy protein isolate, SPI) and fed to triplicate groups of 75 carp fingerlings (75; av. wt. ± SD; 11.4 ± 0.25 g). The growth, feeding efficiencies, digestibility, plasma biochemistry, and intestinal enzymes were measured. Results showed that growth performance of fish fed the S 75- or DJPI-based diets were not significantly different from those fed the C ontrol diet, while carp fed the S 50 had significantly better growth than the J 75 diet. Fish fed the J 75 diet had significantly lower protein and lipid digestibility as well as significantly lower intestinal amylase and protease activities than all other groups. However, all plant protein-based diets led to significantly higher crude protein, crude lipid, and gross energy in the body of common carp compared to the control treatment. Plasma cholesterol and creatinine significantly decreased in the plant protein fed groups, although plasma triglyceride as well as the red blood cells count, hematocrit, albumin, globulin, total plasma protein, and lysozyme activity were higher in plant protein fed groups compared to FM fed group. White blood cells, hemoglobulin concentration, alkaline phosphatase and alanine transaminase activities, and glucose level in blood did not differ significantly among treatments. The results suggest that the DJPI is non-toxic to carp and can be used to replace FM in the diets of common carp up to 75%, but further research to potentially reduce some inherent ANF within this protein source, such as non-starch polysaccharides, may improve nutrient utilization.

KEYWORDS:

Common carp; Growth and nutrient utilization; Jatropha curcas; Physiology and hematology; Soy protein isolates

PMID:
28900838
DOI:
10.1007/s10695-017-0420-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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