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Sci Rep. 2017 Sep 12;7(1):11368. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-11941-3.

Rogdi Defines GABAergic Control of a Wake-promoting Dopaminergic Pathway to Sustain Sleep in Drosophila.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 44919, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34141, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea.
4
Cell Logistics Research Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, 61005, Republic of Korea.
5
School of Life Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan, 44919, Republic of Korea. clim@unist.ac.kr.
6
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 34141, Republic of Korea. jchoe@kaist.ac.kr.

Abstract

Kohlschutter-Tönz syndrome (KTS) is a rare genetic disorder with neurological dysfunctions including seizure and intellectual impairment. Mutations at the Rogdi locus have been linked to development of KTS, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that a Drosophila homolog of Rogdi acts as a novel sleep-promoting factor by supporting a specific subset of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission. Rogdi mutant flies displayed insomnia-like behaviors accompanied by sleep fragmentation and delay in sleep initiation. The sleep suppression phenotypes were rescued by sustaining GABAergic transmission primarily via metabotropic GABA receptors or by blocking wake-promoting dopaminergic pathways. Transgenic rescue further mapped GABAergic neurons as a cell-autonomous locus important for Rogdi-dependent sleep, implying metabotropic GABA transmission upstream of the dopaminergic inhibition of sleep. Consistently, an agonist specific to metabotropic but not ionotropic GABA receptors titrated the wake-promoting effects of dopaminergic neuron excitation. Taken together, these data provide the first genetic evidence that implicates Rogdi in sleep regulation via GABAergic control of dopaminergic signaling. Given the strong relevance of GABA to epilepsy, we propose that similar mechanisms might underlie the neural pathogenesis of Rogdi-associated KTS.

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