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CJEM. 2018 Mar;20(2):300-306. doi: 10.1017/cem.2017.394. Epub 2017 Sep 13.

The impact of social media promotion with infographics and podcasts on research dissemination and readership.

Author information

1
*Department of Emergency Medicine,University of Saskatchewan,Saskatoon,SK.
2
†Department of Emergency Medicine,Queen's University,Kingston,ON.
3
‡Division of Emergency Medicine,Western University,London,ON.
4
§Department of Emergency Medicine,University of Calgary,Calgary,AB.
5
¶Department of Emergency Medicine,Jewish General Hospital,Montreal QC.
6
**Division of Emergency Medicine,McMaster University,Hamilton,ON.
7
††Division of Emergency Medicine,University of Toronto,Toronto,ON.
8
‡‡Department of Emergency Medicine,University of Kentucky,Lexington,KY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In 2015 and 2016, the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine (CJEM) Social Media (SoMe) Team collaborated with established medical websites to promote CJEM articles using podcasts and infographics while tracking dissemination and readership.

METHODS:

CJEM publications in the "Original Research" and "State of the Art" sections were selected by the SoMe Team for podcast and infographic promotion based on their perceived interest to emergency physicians. A control group was composed retrospectively of articles from the 2015 and 2016 issues with the highest Altmetric score that received standard Facebook and Twitter promotions. Studies on SoMe topics were excluded. Dissemination was quantified by January 1, 2017 Altmetric scores. Readership was measured by abstract and full-text views over a 3-month period. The number needed to view (NNV) was calculated by dividing abstract views by full-text views.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine of 88 articles that met inclusion were included in the podcast (6), infographic (11), and control (12) groups. Descriptive statistics (mean, 95% confidence interval) were calculated for podcast (Altmetric: 61, 42-80; Abstract: 1795, 1135-2455; Full-text: 431, 0-1031), infographic (Altmetric: 31.5, 19-43; Abstract: 590, 361-819; Full-text: 65, 33-98), and control (Altmetric: 12, 8-15; Abstract: 257, 159-354; Full-Text: 73, 38-109) articles. The NNV was 4.2 for podcast, 9.0 for infographic, and 3.5 for control articles. Discussion Limitations included selection bias, the influence of SoMe promotion on the Altmetric scores, and a lack of generalizability to other journals.

CONCLUSION:

Collaboration with established SoMe websites using podcasts and infographics was associated with increased Altmetric scores and abstract views but not full-text article views.

KEYWORDS:

infographics; knowledge translation; online educational resources; podcasts; social media

PMID:
28899440
DOI:
10.1017/cem.2017.394
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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