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J Health Popul Nutr. 2017 Sep 12;36(1):34. doi: 10.1186/s41043-017-0111-3.

Effective delivery of social and behavior change communication through a Care Group model in a supplementary feeding program.

Author information

1
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, 150 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
4
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, 150 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA, USA. Breanne.Langlois@tufts.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2014, an intervention aimed at increasing the oil in corn soy blend (CSB) porridge prepared by caregivers of children with moderate acute malnutrition was implemented in Southern Malawi. This analysis describes the flow of key messages delivered through the Care Group model during this intervention.

METHODS:

The intervention provided a supplementary food ration of CSB and oil and used a Care Group model in which healthcare workers were trained to deliver social and behavior change communication (SBCC) to care group volunteers who then delivered messages to caregivers of beneficiary children. Healthcare workers also delivered messages to caregivers directly. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with all three groups in order to determine the exchange of key messages about ingredient use, storage, and purpose, which were analyzed descriptively.

RESULTS:

Analysis of SBCC flow and information exchange showed that 100% of caregivers reported learning about the amounts of oil and CSB to use while preparing porridge and over 90% of caregivers, healthcare workers, and care group volunteers reported talking about it. Focus groups confirmed an effective flow of communication among these three groups.

CONCLUSION:

This analysis evaluated the flow of key SBCC messages through multiple, overlapping lines of communication among healthcare workers, care group volunteers, and caregivers; the effective transmission of these SBCC messages through this model may contribute to the success of a supplementary feeding intervention program.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01873196 ).

KEYWORDS:

Corn soy blend; Food aid; Moderate acute malnutrition; Social and behavior change communication; Supplementary feeding

PMID:
28899434
PMCID:
PMC5596483
DOI:
10.1186/s41043-017-0111-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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