Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain. 2017 Aug 1;140(8):2104-2111. doi: 10.1093/brain/awx148.

Slow wave sleep disruption increases cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
2
Hope Center for Neurological Disorders, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
3
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Radboudumc Alzheimer Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
6
Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
7
Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Abstract

See Mander et al. (doi:10.1093/awx174) for a scientific commentary on this article.Sleep deprivation increases amyloid-β, suggesting that chronically disrupted sleep may promote amyloid plaques and other downstream Alzheimer's disease pathologies including tauopathy or inflammation. To date, studies have not examined which aspect of sleep modulates amyloid-β or other Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Seventeen healthy adults (age 35-65 years) without sleep disorders underwent 5-14 days of actigraphy, followed by slow wave activity disruption during polysomnogram, and cerebrospinal fluid collection the following morning for measurement of amyloid-β, tau, total protein, YKL-40, and hypocretin. Data were compared to an identical protocol, with a sham condition during polysomnogram. Specific disruption of slow wave activity correlated with an increase in amyloid-β40 (r = 0.610, P = 0.009). This effect was specific for slow wave activity, and not for sleep duration or efficiency. This effect was also specific to amyloid-β, and not total protein, tau, YKL-40, or hypocretin. Additionally, worse home sleep quality, as measured by sleep efficiency by actigraphy in the six nights preceding lumbar punctures, was associated with higher tau (r = 0.543, P = 0.045). Slow wave activity disruption increases amyloid-β levels acutely, and poorer sleep quality over several days increases tau. These effects are specific to neuronally-derived proteins, which suggests they are likely driven by changes in neuronal activity during disrupted sleep.

KEYWORDS:

EEG; beta-amyloid; sleep; slow wave activity; tau

PMID:
28899014
PMCID:
PMC5790144
DOI:
10.1093/brain/awx148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center