Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Argent Pediatr. 2017 Oct 1;115(5):497-500. doi: 10.5546/aap.2017.eng.497.

Association between sleep-related breathing disorders and academic performance among children from Concepción, Chile.

[Article in English, Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the publisher]

Author information

1
Escuela de Kinesiología, Facultad de Salud, Universidad Santo Tomás, Concepción, Chile.
2
Laboratorio de Sueño, Clínica Universitaria de San Pedro de la Paz, Chile.
3
Programa de Magíster en Ciencias Médicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco, Chile.
4
Laboratorio de Biología del Ejercicio, Escuela de Kinesiología, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad San Sebastián, Concepción, Chile. ivan.rodriguez@uss.cl.
5
Grupo de Investigación en Salud Cardiovascular y Respiratoria IDEAS-CVR, Concepción, Chile.
6
Centro de Investigación en Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chile.
7
Departamento de Pediatría, Universidad de Concepción. Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Guillermo Grant Benavente, Concepción, Chile.
8
Departamento de Especialidades, Universidad de Concepción. Servicio de Neurología, Hospital Guillermo Grant Benavente, Concepción, Chile.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

The objective of this study was to establish an association between academic performance in Math, Language Arts, and Science and the presence of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) among healthy schoolchildren from the city of Concepción, Chile. Healthy children were defined as those without comorbidities. Outcome measures of interest included the analysis of academic performance in Math, Language Arts, and Science and the presence of SRBD assessed using the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. Two-hundred and fifty-six children were included in the study (59.8% were boys). In the studied sample, SRBD prevalence was 24.6%. A significant association was observed between SRBD and a low performance in Math (odds ratio |-#91;OR|-#93;: 3.1, 1.5-6.8), Language Arts (OR:2.5, 1.1-5.5), and Science (OR: 4.2, 1.7-10.0). To conclude, in the studied sample, the presence of SRBD was associated with a low academic performance in Language Arts, Math, and Science.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Neurocognitive disorder; Obstructive sleep apnea; Snoring; Surveys and questionnaires

PMID:
28895699
DOI:
10.5546/aap.2017.eng.497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Sociedad Argentina de Pediatria
Loading ...
Support Center