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Clin Rehabil. 2018 Apr;32(4):536-545. doi: 10.1177/0269215517730670. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

The impact of self-perceived limitations, stigma and sense of coherence on quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: results of a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
1 Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
2 Wenckebach Institute, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
3
3 Department of Sociology, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
4
4 Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the impact of perceived limitations, stigma and sense of coherence on quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING:

Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands.

SUBJECTS:

Multiple sclerosis patients.

MAIN MEASURES:

World Health Organization Quality of Life - abbreviated version, Stigma Scale for Chronic Illness, Sense of Coherence Scale, background and disease-related questions.

RESULTS:

In total, 185 patients (61% response rate) participated in the study with moderate to severe limitations. Stigma was highly prevalent but low in severity. Patients with a higher sense of coherence experienced a lower level of limitations ( B = -0.063, P < 0.01) and less stigma (enacted stigma B = -0.030, P < 0.01; self-stigma B = -0.037, P < 0.01). Patients with a higher level of limitations experienced more stigma (enacted stigma B = 0.044, P < 0.05; self-stigma B = 0.063, P < 0.01). Patients with a higher sense of coherence experienced better quality of life (physical health B = 0.059, P < 0.01; psychological health B = 0.062, P < 0.01; social relationships B = 0.052, P < 0.01; environmental aspects B = 0.030, P < 0.01). Patients with a higher level of limitations experienced poorer quality of life (physical health B = -0.364, P < 0.01; psychological health B = -0.089, P < 0.05) and patients with more stigma also experienced poorer quality of life (self-stigma: physical health B = -0.073, P < 0.01; psychological health B = -0.089, P < 0.01; social relationships B = -0.124, P < 0.01; environmental aspects B = -0.052, P < 0.01, and enacted stigma: physical health B = -0.085, P < 0.10).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with less perceived limitations and stigma and a higher level of sense of coherence experienced better quality of life. Patients with a higher sense of coherence experienced a lower level of limitations and less stigma.

KEYWORDS:

Sense of coherence; multiple sclerosis; quality of life; stigma

PMID:
28895427
PMCID:
PMC5865470
DOI:
10.1177/0269215517730670
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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