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Sci Rep. 2017 Sep 11;7(1):11227. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-10644-z.

Elongation factor Tu is a multifunctional and processed moonlighting protein.

Author information

1
The ithree institute, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW, 2007, Australia.
2
Technische Universität Dresden, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307, Dresden, Germany.
3
Proteomics Core Facility, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW, 2007, Australia.
4
Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, Norfolk, NR4 7UA, UK.
5
The ithree institute, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW, 2007, Australia. Steven.Djordjevic@uts.edu.au.
6
Proteomics Core Facility, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW, 2007, Australia. Steven.Djordjevic@uts.edu.au.

Abstract

Many bacterial moonlighting proteins were originally described in medically, agriculturally, and commercially important members of the low G + C Firmicutes. We show Elongation factor Tu (Ef-Tu) moonlights on the surface of the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SaEf-Tu) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MpnEf-Tu), and the porcine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MhpEf-Tu). Ef-Tu is also a target of multiple processing events on the cell surface and these were characterised using an N-terminomics pipeline. Recombinant MpnEf-Tu bound strongly to a diverse range of host molecules, and when bound to plasminogen, was able to convert plasminogen to plasmin in the presence of plasminogen activators. Fragments of Ef-Tu retain binding capabilities to host proteins. Bioinformatics and structural modelling studies indicate that the accumulation of positively charged amino acids in short linear motifs (SLiMs), and protein processing promote multifunctional behaviour. Codon bias engendered by an A + T rich genome may influence how positively-charged residues accumulate in SLiMs.

PMID:
28894125
PMCID:
PMC5593925
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-10644-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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