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BMC Cancer. 2017 Sep 11;17(1):642. doi: 10.1186/s12885-017-3625-6.

Involvement of DPP9 in gene fusions in serous ovarian carcinoma.

Author information

1
Section for Cancer Cytogenetics, Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
2
Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
4
Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
5
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Gynecology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
7
Section for Cancer Cytogenetics, Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. francesca.micci@medisin.uio.no.
8
Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. francesca.micci@medisin.uio.no.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A fusion gene is a hybrid gene consisting of parts from two previously independent genes. Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene breakage are frequent in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and have been reported as a common mechanism for inactivating tumor suppressor genes. However, no fusion genes have been repeatedly reported to be recurrent driver events in ovarian carcinogenesis. We combined genomic and transcriptomic information to identify novel fusion gene candidates and aberrantly expressed genes in ovarian carcinomas.

METHODS:

Examined were 19 previously karyotyped ovarian carcinomas (18 of the serous histotype and one undifferentiated). First, karyotypic aberrations were compared to fusion gene candidates identified by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). In addition, we used exon-level gene expression microarrays as a screening tool to identify aberrantly expressed genes possibly involved in gene fusion events, and compared the findings to the RNA-seq data.

RESULTS:

We found a DPP9-PPP6R3 fusion transcript in one tumor showing a matching genomic 11;19-translocation. Another tumor had a rearrangement of DPP9 with PLIN3. Both rearrangements were associated with diminished expression of the 3' end of DPP9 corresponding to the breakpoints identified by RNA-seq. For the exon-level expression analysis, candidate fusion partner genes were ranked according to deviating expression compared to the median of the sample set. The results were collated with data obtained from the RNA-seq analysis. Several fusion candidates were identified, among them TMEM123-MMP27, ZBTB46-WFDC13, and PLXNB1-PRKAR2A, all of which led to stronger expression of the 3' genes. In view of our previous findings of nonrandom rearrangements of chromosome 19 in this cancer type, particular emphasis was given to changes of this chromosome and a DDA1-FAM129C fusion event was identified.

CONCLUSIONS:

We have identified novel fusion gene candidates in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. DPP9 was involved in two different fusion transcripts that both resulted in deregulated expression of the 3' end of the transcript and thus possible loss of the active domains in the DPP9 protein. The identified rearrangements might play a role in tumorigenesis or tumor progression.

KEYWORDS:

DPP9; Fusion genes; Gene expression; Ovarian carcinoma

PMID:
28893231
PMCID:
PMC5594496
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-017-3625-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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