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PLoS One. 2017 Sep 11;12(9):e0183911. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183911. eCollection 2017.

Frailty is associated with objectively assessed sedentary behaviour patterns in older adults: Evidence from the Toledo Study for Healthy Aging (TSHA).

Author information

1
Department of Exercise Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
2
GENUD Toledo Research Group, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain.
3
CIBER of Frailty and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain.
4
GENUD Research Group, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Huesca, Spain.
5
Geriatric Department, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain.
6
Geriatric Department, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Spain.
7
ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the association of sedentary behaviour patterns with frailty in older people.

SETTING:

Clinical setting.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional, observational study.

PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS:

A triaxial accelerometer was used in a subsample from the Toledo Study for Healthy Aging (519 participants, 67-97 years) to assess several sedentary behaviour patterns including sedentary time per day, the number and duration (min) of breaks in sedentary time per day, and the proportion of the day spent in sedentary bouts of 10 minutes or more. Frailty was assessed using the Frailty Trait Scale (FTS). Regression analysis was used to ascertain the associations between sedentary behaviour patterns and frailty.

RESULTS:

Sedentary time per day and the proportion of the day spent in sedentary bouts of 10 minutes or more, were positively associated with frailty in the study sample. Conversely, the time spent in breaks in sedentary time was negatively associated with frailty.

CONCLUSION:

In summary, breaking up sedentary time and time spent in sedentary behaviour are associated with frailty in older people.

PMID:
28892505
PMCID:
PMC5593182
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0183911
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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