Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2018 Apr;31(2):197-208. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12508. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Structured advice provided by a dietitian increases adherence of consumers to diet and lifestyle changes and lowers blood low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol: the Increasing Adherence of Consumers to Diet & Lifestyle Changes to Lower (LDL) Cholesterol (ACT) randomised controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, School of Food, Biotechnology and Development, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
2
Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Hygeias Melathron Infirmary, Athens, Greece.
3
Unilever R&D, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
5
Department of Cardiology, Euroclinic, Athens, Greece.
6
Errikos Dunant, Hospital Centre, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence from healthcare professionals suggest that consumer compliance to healthy diet and lifestyle changes is often poor. The present study investigated the effect of advice provided by a physician or dietitian on consumer adherence to these measures combined with consuming foods with added plant sterols (PS) with the aim of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

METHODS:

One hundred mildly-to-moderately hypercholesterolaemic individuals were enrolled into a parallel, randomised, placebo-controlled study. Dietitians (dietitian group; DG) advised 50 individuals in six weekly face-to-face behavioural therapy sessions, whereas the other 50 received standard advice from physicians (physician group, PG). Both groups consumed foods with added PS (three servings a day) for 6 weeks. Subsequently, all individuals were followed-up for another 6 weeks under real-life conditions. Blood lipids were measured at baseline and weeks 6 and 12 and 3-day diet diaries were taken at weeks 1, 6 and 12.

RESULTS:

Individuals in the DG significantly improved their dietary habits, physical activity and increased PS intake compared to the PG. After 6 weeks, LDL-C decreased in both groups compared to baseline without any significant differences between groups. At week 12, LDL-C was further significantly improved only in the DG (P = 0.006) compared to week 6. Total cholesterol, LDL-C and triglycerides were significantly lower in the DG compared to the PG at week 12 after adjusting for levels at week 6 (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.009, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although structured counselling by dietitians and common standard advice by physicians were equally effective with respect to improving blood cholesterol after 6 weeks, dietitians were more effective in the longer-term (i.e. 6 weeks after the end of the intervention period).

KEYWORDS:

adherence; blood cholesterol; dietary advice; lifestyle behaviours; plant sterols

PMID:
28891084
DOI:
10.1111/jhn.12508
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center