Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Sep 9;6(9). pii: e005947. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.117.005947.

Relationship of Sleep Duration With All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

Yin J1,2, Jin X1,2, Shan Z1,2,3, Li S1,2, Huang H1,2, Li P1,2, Peng X1,2, Peng Z1,2, Yu K1,2, Bao W4, Yang W1,2, Chen X5, Liu L6,2.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, China.
2
MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, China.
3
Departments of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.
5
School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Xinzao, Panyu District, Guangzhou, China lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn wwchenxy1@163.com.
6
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, China lgliu@mails.tjmu.edu.cn wwchenxy1@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Effects of extreme sleep duration on risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes remain controversial. We aimed to quantify the dose-response relationships of sleep duration with risk of all-cause mortality, total cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for prospective cohort studies published before December 1, 2016, that examined the associations between sleep duration and at least 1 of the 4 outcomes in generally healthy populations. U-shaped associations were indicated between sleep duration and risk of all outcomes, with the lowest risk observed for ≈7-hour sleep duration per day, which was varied little by sex. For all-cause mortality, when sleep duration was <7 hours per day, the pooled relative risk (RR) was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.04-1.07) per 1-hour reduction; when sleep duration was >7 hours per day, the pooled RR was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.11-1.15) per 1-hour increment. For total cardiovascular disease, the pooled RR was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.03-1.08) per 1-hour reduction and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.08-1.16) per 1-hour increment of sleep duration. For coronary heart disease, the pooled RR was 1.07 (95% CI, 1.03-1.12) per 1-hour reduction and 1.05 (95% CI, 1.00-1.10) per 1-hour increment of sleep duration. For stroke, the pooled RR was 1.05 (95% CI, 1.01-1.09) per 1-hour reduction and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.14-1.21) per 1-hour increment of sleep duration.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that both short and long sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events.

KEYWORDS:

all‐cause death; cardiovascular disease; coronary heart disease; meta‐analysis; sleep; stroke

PMID:
28889101
PMCID:
PMC5634263
DOI:
10.1161/JAHA.117.005947
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center