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Crit Care Clin. 2017 Oct;33(4):767-775. doi: 10.1016/j.ccc.2017.07.001.

Developing an Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical Circulatory Support, Gill Heart & Vascular Institute, UK HealthCare, Pavilion A 08.261, 1000 South Limestone, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.
2
Department of Mechanical Circulatory Support, Gill Heart & Vascular Institute, UK HealthCare, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, MN-264, Lexington, KY 40536, USA. Electronic address: jzwis2@uky.edu.

Abstract

The development of a successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) program requires an institutional commitment and the multidisciplinary cooperation of trained specialty personnel from nursing, internal medicine, anesthesiology, pulmonology, emergency medicine, critical care, and surgery and often pediatrics as well. The specialized training necessary to cultivate an integrated team capable of providing life-saving ECMO cannot be underestimated. The development of a successful ECMO program is best suited to a tertiary medical center that is centrally/regionally located and capable of financially supporting the level of expertise required as well as managing the program's overall cost effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Implementation; Multidisciplinary approach; Outcomes; Patient management

PMID:
28887926
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccc.2017.07.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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