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Environ Health Perspect. 2017 Aug 18;125(8):087012. doi: 10.1289/EHP1374.

Personal Care Product Use in Men and Urinary Concentrations of Select Phthalate Metabolites and Parabens: Results from the Environment And Reproductive Health (EARTH) Study.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
6
Department of Growth and Reproduction & EDMaRC, Rigshospitalet University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University , Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
9
Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Personal care products (PCPs) are exposure sources to phthalates and parabens; however, their contribution to men's exposure is understudied.

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the association between PCP use and urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites and parabens in men.

METHODS:

In a prospective cohort, at multiple study visits, men self-reported their use of 14 PCPs and provided a urine sample (2004-2015, Boston, MA). We measured urinary concentrations of 9 phthalate metabolites and methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben. We estimated the covariate-adjusted percent change in urinary concentrations associated with PCP use using linear mixed and Tobit mixed regressions. We also estimated weights for each PCP in a weighted binary score regression and modeled the resulting composite weighted PCP use.

RESULTS:

Four hundred men contributed 1,037 urine samples (mean of 3/man). The largest percent increase in monoethyl phthalate (MEP) was associated with use of cologne/perfume (83%, p-value<0.01) and deodorant (74%, p-value<0.01). In contrast, the largest percent increase for parabens was associated with the use of suntan/sunblock lotion (66-156%) and hand/body lotion (79-147%). Increases in MEP and parabens were generally greater with PCP use within 6 h of urine collection. A subset of 10 PCPs that were used within 6 h of urine collection contributed to at least 70% of the weighted score and predicted a 254-1,333% increase in MEP and parabens concentrations. Associations between PCP use and concentrations of the other phthalate metabolites were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

We identified 10 PCPs of relevance and demonstrated that their use within 6 h of urine collection strongly predicted MEP and paraben urinary concentrations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1374.

PMID:
28886595
PMCID:
PMC5783668
DOI:
10.1289/EHP1374
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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