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Int J Infect Dis. 2017 Nov;64:9-14. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.013. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Clinical evaluation of early acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus carriage by newborns.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, The Edmond and Lili Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer 52621, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: maayan@post.tau.ac.il.
2
Department of Neonatology, The Edmond and Lili Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer 52621, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
3
Gertner Institute, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.
4
Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
5
Obstetrics and Gynecology Division, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
6
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
7
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Gertner Institute, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; Infectious Diseases Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about neonatal Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Sites and clinical outcomes of S. aureus colonization during the first month of life were evaluated in this study.

METHODS:

A cohort of 279 infants born at term to 277 mothers was included. Maternal S. aureus colonization status was examined before labor. Newborns were screened for nasal, auricular, umbilical, and rectal colonization, one to three times within 100h after birth, and infants of carrier mothers were re-screened at 1 month. Medical data were recorded from the medical charts at discharge and at the 1-month follow-up interview.

RESULTS:

Overall 43 out of 279 (15.4%) infants acquired S. aureus within the first days of life. The only two predictors of S. aureus carriage in the postnatal period were maternal S. aureus carriage (odds ratio 7.905, 95% confidence interval 3.182-19.638) and maternal antibiotic treatment during labor (odds ratio 0.121, 95% confidence interval 0.016-0.949). Among colonized children, the nose (56%) and rectum (40%) were more frequently colonized, while ear (26%) and umbilicus (16%) colonization were less common. Co-colonization at two sites was rare (4%), but always predicted carriage at 1 month of age. Maternal and neonatal characteristics, including neonatal outcomes, were similar between S. aureus carrier and non-carrier infants during the first month of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal carriage is the major predictor of neonatal S. aureus carriage. The nose and rectum are the main sites of neonatal carriage. S. aureus carriage was not associated with neonatal complications throughout the first month of life. The long-term significance of early S. aureus carriage is yet to be determined.

KEYWORDS:

Colonization; Neonatal outcome; Staphylococcus aureus

PMID:
28882667
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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