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Int J Infect Dis. 2017 Nov;64:38-41. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.012. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Human gastric hyperinfection by Anisakis simplex: A severe and unusual presentation and a brief review.

Author information

1
Laboratório de Microbiologia Clínica e Biologia Molecular, Serviço de Patologia Clínica, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Hospital Egas Moniz, Rua da Junqueira 126, 1349-019 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: teresambf@yahoo.com.
2
Biopremier SA, Campus da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: mjgrodrigues@gmail.com.
3
Biopremier SA, Campus da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: isofcastro@gmail.com.
4
Centro de Estudos de Doenças Crónicas, CEDOC, NOVA Medical School, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: paulo.paixao@nms.unl.pt.
5
Unidade de Gastroenterologia, Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: pmarques@hospitaldaluz.pt.
6
Unidade de Gastroenterologia do Hospital Garcia da Orta, Almada, Portugal. Electronic address: lidia.roque.ramos@gmail.com.
7
Global Health and Tropical Medicine, GHTM, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, UNL, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: silvanabelo@ihmt.unl.pt.
8
Global Health and Tropical Medicine, GHTM, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, UNL, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: pedroferreira@ihmt.unl.pt.
9
Serviço de Doenças Infecciosas e Medicina Tropical, Hospital Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: mansinho.k@gmail.com.
10
Laboratório de Microbiologia Clínica e Biologia Molecular, Serviço de Patologia Clínica, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Hospital Egas Moniz, Rua da Junqueira 126, 1349-019 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: ctoscano@chlo.min-saude.pt.

Abstract

Anisakiasis is an emerging marine food-borne zoonosis resulting from the accidental ingestion of Anisakis larvae, through the consumption of raw or undercooked infected seafood products. The first case of human gastric hyperinfection by Anisakis simplex with an unusual and severe presentation, occurring in a Portuguese woman, is described in this article. Over 140 anisakid larvae were removed by gastroscopy. Massive infection is uncommon in areas where the consumption of raw fish is not part of the traditional diet, as is the case in Portugal. The increased consumption of raw seafood products is considered a health determinant in the rise in cases of anisakiasis. However, clinicians should be aware of the emergence of these infections, not only because of the new dietary habits of the population, but also because of the high prevalence of Anisakis larvae in the different fish species usually consumed by the population, collected on the Portuguese coast.

KEYWORDS:

Anisakiasis; Emergent zoonosis; Fishery products; Foodborne disease

PMID:
28882665
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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