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J Ment Health. 2017 Sep 6:1-13. doi: 10.1080/09638237.2017.1370629. [Epub ahead of print]

Recovery from depression: a systematic review of perceptions and associated factors.

Author information

1
a Clinical Psychology Unit, Department of Psychology , University of Sheffield , Sheffield , UK , and.
2
b Centre for Psychological Services Research, Department of Psychology , University of Sheffield , Sheffield , UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite extensive literature examining perceptions of recovery from severe mental illness, literature focusing on recovery from depression in adults is limited.

AIM:

Systematically review the existing literature investigating patients' and clinicians' perceptions of, and factors associated with, recovery from depression.

METHOD:

Studies investigating perceptions of, and factors associated with, recovery from depression in adults were identified through database searches. Studies were assessed against inclusion criteria and quality rating checklists.

RESULTS:

Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Recovery from depression is perceived as a complex, personal journey. The concept of normalised, biomedical definitions of recovery is not supported, with the construction of self and societal gender expectations identified by women as central to recovery. Recovery from depression was associated with higher levels of perceived social support and group memberships. A range of factors are identified as influencing recovery. However, physicians and patients prioritise different factors assessing what is important in being "cured" from depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Recovery from depression is perceived by patients as a complex, personal process, influenced by a range of factors. However, greater understanding of clinicians' perceptions of client recovery from depression is essential to inform clinical practice and influence future research.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; gender; patient and clinician perspectives; perceived social support; recovery

PMID:
28877614
DOI:
10.1080/09638237.2017.1370629
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