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Curr Diab Rep. 2017 Sep 5;17(10):96. doi: 10.1007/s11892-017-0928-6.

Screening Intervals for Diabetic Retinopathy and Implications for Care.

Author information

1
Gloucestershire Retinal Research Group, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Office above Oakley Ward, Cheltenham General Hospital, Sandford Road, Cheltenham, GL53 7AN, UK. peter.scanlon@glos.nhs.uk.
2
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK. peter.scanlon@glos.nhs.uk.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The purpose of this study is to review the evidence that lower risk groups who could safely be screened less frequently for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (DR) than annually.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Data have demonstrated that people with no DR in either eye are at a low risk of progression to sight-threatening DR over a 2-year period (event rate 4.8 per 1000 person years), irrespective of whether the screening method is one-field non-mydriatic or two-field mydriatic digital photography. Low risk has been defined as no retinopathy on two consecutive screening episodes or no retinopathy on one screening episode combined with risk factor data. The risk of an extension to 2 years is less than 5 per 1000 person years in a population with a national screening programme, and the general standard of diabetes care is relatively good, whether low risk is defined as no retinopathy on two consecutive screening episodes or no retinopathy on one screening episode combined with other risk factor data. The definition used in different populations is likely to depend on the availability of data.

KEYWORDS:

Imaging; Retinal screening; Retinopathy; Screening interval; Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy; Visual loss

PMID:
28875458
PMCID:
PMC5585285
DOI:
10.1007/s11892-017-0928-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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