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Gigascience. 2017 Aug 1;6(8):1-12. doi: 10.1093/gigascience/gix058.

Connections between the human gut microbiome and gestational diabetes mellitus.

Kuang YS1, Lu JH1,2, Li SH1, Li JH3,4, Yuan MY1,2, He JR1,2, Chen NN1,2, Xiao WQ1,2, Shen SY1,2, Qiu L1,2, Wu YF1,2, Hu CY1,2, Wu YY1,2, Li WD1,2, Chen QZ5, Deng HW1,6, Papasian CJ7, Xia HM1,8, Qiu X1,2.

Author information

1
Division of Birth Cohort Study, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China.
2
Department of Women and Children's Health Care, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China.
3
BGI-Shenzhen, China National GeneBank-Shenzhen, Dapeng District, Shenzhen 518083, China.
4
Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Human commensal microorganisms and Health Research, BGI-Shenzhen, Dapeng District, Shenzhen 518083, China.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China.
6
Center of Bioinformatics and Genomics, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropic Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 220, USA.
7
Department of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, University of Missouri - Kansas City, 2411 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.
8
Department of Neonatal Surgery, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China.

Abstract

The human gut microbiome can modulate metabolic health and affect insulin resistance, and it may play an important role in the etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 43 GDM patients and 81 healthy pregnant women via whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing of their fecal samples, collected at 21-29 weeks, to explore associations between GDM and the composition of microbial taxonomic units and functional genes. A metagenome-wide association study identified 154 837 genes, which clustered into 129 metagenome linkage groups (MLGs) for species description, with significant relative abundance differences between the 2 cohorts. Parabacteroides distasonis, Klebsiella variicola, etc., were enriched in GDM patients, whereas Methanobrevibacter smithii, Alistipes spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium spp. were enriched in controls. The ratios of the gross abundances of GDM-enriched MLGs to control-enriched MLGs were positively correlated with blood glucose levels. A random forest model shows that fecal MLGs have excellent discriminatory power to predict GDM status. Our study discovered novel relationships between the gut microbiome and GDM status and suggests that changes in microbial composition may potentially be used to identify individuals at risk for GDM.

KEYWORDS:

gestational diabetes mellitus; gut microbiome; metagenome-wide association

PMID:
28873967
PMCID:
PMC5597849
DOI:
10.1093/gigascience/gix058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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